07.20.13

I sent out a bunch of reviews recently that of course were all rejected. Here is a short one about the recent Resonars album. Looking back at my reviews, I realize I may have written about them too many times. But I can’t help it; I think they are sorely underrated. In a recent set of submissions, I mentioned to the editor of a large magazine he should be listening to the Resonars. I bet he went right out and checked them out.

The Resonars- Crummy Desert Sound
Burger Records
Desert psych masters continue to bake in the sun.
This long-standing psychedelic band from Tucson, Arizona has weathered several retro resurgences. Six albums over nearly fifteen years find a psychedelic powerhouse producing consistently great psychedelic pop albums while languishing in the blazing Arizona desert. The Resonars combine jangly guitars and carefully placed fuzz to create psychedelic pop influenced heavily by Revolver-era Beatles. The band’s unique brand of pop-infused psychedelia is served with precision, Hollie’s style vocal harmonies. Tomorrow Gears and Vanishing People are punk-tempo rockers framing tropes of early powerpop. But this band should not be written off as simply a retro outfit. Thick layers of upbeat psychedelic riffs hold the interest of retro hounds, but the songwriting on Crummy Desert Sound is multifaceted.

07.03.13

I ‘m home after a little over a week in the hospital. The surgery was a success. I kept my kidney and it seems the tumor is gone. After a couple of months of recovery, I hope to pull the year together and get some things accomplished. I never know how much medical stuff to share here. Many people have heard about my recent struggles with cancer have contacted me. I’m touched so many people take time to wish me well. I’m glad to say I’m feeling better, well enough to write, and hope to keep up at least with some regular reviews and things until I’m 100%.

Also, It’s pretty obvious that writing on the site has fallen off a bit. But I hope to rectify that and I’m still sending around The League a bit in hopes of getting it published. If that doesn’t work, I’m determined to do it myself and keep working forward. I’ve been working on writing some blurbs and new submissions for magazines. I’ve got some boss new albums recently and, of course, I’m watching way to many movies. Also been doing some new fiction, so look back for that. Rejected reviews will end up here and I’m working to at least polish a few new short stories. Below are some words on two time travel films I watched recently and thought were pretty good.


Timecrimes (2007)

How far could you go back in time and not affect events in your life? Not far according to Nacho Vigalondo’s clever time travel film Timecrimes. Hector (Karra Elejalde) travels back in time only long enough to observe himself on a casual afternoon. But the chain of events that leads to his trying to fix simple mistakes causes major mishaps. This is a low budget film with a sense of urgency created by Vigalondo’s tight shooting style. It’s a clever script with the tone of a dark comedy. The small world of Hector’s afternoon removes the need for excessive special effects and long explanations. If the plot was entirely dissected, the story might not entirely make sense, but that can almost be said about any time travel film. Hector’s desperation to put things right creates the plausible doubt needed to enjoy a time travel film.

 


Primer (2004)

Primer’s plot also involves protagonists traveling backwards to fix problems set in motion during experiments with time travel. Abe (David Sulivan) and Aaron (Shane Carruth) discover a way to turn back the clock while studying gravity. Abe builds a prototype of a machine that enables them to go back and play the stock market. Primer is best enjoyed if you just let it be. It’s a brilliant movie that’s occasionally too smart for it’s own good. Too much time spent contemplating the minutia of the story ruins the fun. The film is a real triumph if you consider it was made for around $7000. It’s a low budget home run with an obligatory cult following.


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